felixios
Stuff that inspires me. No, really.
felixios
+
the-comics-sans:

Young Yoda by Marco Teixeira
Fan Fiction Backstory:
The truth of Yoda’s past is much darker then one would assume from his ancient demeanor. This is the beginning of Yoda.
Yoda’s species is one of which is remarkably force-sensitive and at the time of his birth, a great disturbance in the force was felt due to the fact that Yoda was most force-sensitive being in the galaxy. By the time Yoda was discovered by the Jedi as a young adult, he appeared to have independently become force-adept, an incredible rarity to behold in one who has not been trained by Jedi or Sith alike.
Upon discovery of the nature of his abilities,Yoda immediately enlisted to be trained as a Jedi. At the time, while this went against the ancient practices of the Jedi to train an adult, there was no historical precedent for one of Yoda’s immensely innate power, and he was accepted despite the reservations of the Jedi Consulars who believe Yoda was too dangerous. The Jedi Guardians overruled them believing instead his power was too great to ignore and would provide them with a critical ally, once trained, in the struggle against the dark side.
This action quickly proved to be folly. Yoda was far too arrogant and headstrong to make a good student, and was spoiled by abilities that exceed most of his trainers, he seemed to promote dark qualities in those in his vicinity such as jealousy and anger and as a result he was alienated by all the other students and even his trainers, who turned a blind eye to systemic bullying which Yoda suffered at the hands of the other students.
This came to an apex when Yoda’s mental resilience was finally broken by the provocation of a particularly malicious Padawan whom had previously been the best student prior to Yoda’s arrival. In a bitter and petty exchange, Yoda accidentally killed his antagonist. The death sparked outrage in the Jedi counsel, and Yoda was exiled from the Jedi and left to fend for himself on the dilapidated swamp planet of Dagoba.
Watching afar from the shadows, the Sith emerge on news of Yoda’s exile and an agent was sent to Dagoba. Posing as a recent exile as well, Yoda was unwittingly allied to the Sith, where he then gained full measure of the force whilst having his anger and hatred channeled into powerful new abilities.
Jedi scouts sensed a new disturbance in the force and the dark side activity on Dagoba. Fearing the apparent conversion of Yoda, the counsel acted quickly and harshly against the Sith machinations. Believing him to now be a Sith Lord, a large group of Jedi knights was dispatched to capture Yoda in order restore balance to the force before he became too strong.
After witnessing the Jedi slay his only friend, the exile, Yoda ruthlessly murdered the all of his Jedi pursuers. Being so outraged by the preemptive actions of the counsel against him, he led a lone assault against the high counsel, using their own knowledge and tactics against them. He managed to wipe out half of the highest Jedi masters before he was finally confronted by Master Minch, a native of Yoda’s species. Minch revealed that he was crucial in securing Yoda’s recruitment into the Jedi and that it was he who was to blame for all this. He apologized to Yoda and attempted to console him by lamenting of his own failures in the past to abide by the Jedi way, but Yoda would not hear it.
Knowing Minch was a formidable opponent with a lightsaber, Yoda challenged him to a one-on-one duel. Minch rejected the challenge but Yoda attacked anyway, forcing his hand. After a spectacular fight, it was a draw. Standing face to face, Minch tossed his lightsaber aside leaving him defenseless and spoke something to Yoda in their native language and bowed his head. Before Yoda could ponder the true meaning of Minch’s words or the act of pacifism, he was overcome by his dark inhibitions and struck down the defenseless Minch. Yoda stood there silently, in the heart of the Jedi counsel, for a long time. What remained of the Jedi counsel emerged around him, and one finally spoke, informing Yoda that they were unable to defeat him and that they surrendered.
Yoda waited a long time before responding slowly. “Unnecessary, that will be… however… To atone for this, you must allow me.”
"How so?" Asked one of the survivors.
"Finish my training as a Jedi, I will." Yoda uttered. "Prevent this from happening again, I must."
The eldest counsel member now spoke. “Restoring the balance will take a long time… hundreds of years perhaps.”
"Prepared, I am." Replied Yoda solemnly.
And thus, the remaining counsel, sensing that Yoda’s anger and hate had finally been broken, agreed to accepted him back so that he may correct for his actions. So began the long journey of Yoda’s redemption.
Story source
+
wevortex:

By Ouzo Kim
+
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
2headedsnake:

Leif Podhajsky
+
retrogasm:

Gustav Dore, Ariosto
+
+
earthstory:

Agatised shellSilica is a common material found replacing fossils, often creating such fine grained structures that many biological features such as the grain of bone and wood (see http://tinyurl.com/lpx653u) are exquisitely preserved. In some cases they provide the best insight into long extinct life such as the early Devonian land plants with perfect cell structures preserved by silica rich hot springs in the Rhynie chert of Scotland. Opalised fossils (See http://tinyurl.com/nms2zmd) are another common example. The shell dates from the Eocene (65-34 million years ago) of Morocco, has been replaced by lovely honey coloured agate (due to iron oxide impurities) and is a large specimen, measuring 7.8 x 3.5 x 3.3 cm.LozImage credit: Marin Minerals
+
waterbody:

nudibranch(Hermissenda crassicornis). Princeton CA, June 2014 / SZ3 /
+
yellowcrayolacrayon:

“Life has everything in it. But you only see what your perception allow you to see” 

- Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D
yellowcrayolacrayon:

“Life has everything in it. But you only see what your perception allow you to see” 

- Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D
+
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 
despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 
the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures. 
for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.
notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”
this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.
+
sciencealert:



Australian scientists have created a camera that lets you see cancer in real time, and it’s based on the design of mantis shrimp eyes. http://bit.ly/1u6bKRe